Special Alerts

Jan 09, 2018 : System Pressure Advisory lifted in Fayetteville area – For our customers in Brookwood South, Brentonwood Hill, Kelly Hill and Raintree
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Special Alert

System Pressure Advisory lifted in Fayetteville area – For our customers in Brookwood South, Brentonwood Hill, Kelly Hill and Raintree

Jan 09, 2018

For Aqua customers in the communities of Brookwood South, Brentonwood Hill, Kelly Hill and Raintree, the below, previously issued System Pressure Advisory has been lifted:

Aqua North Carolina purchases some water from Fayetteville Public Works Commission (PWC) and supplies some of our customers with this water. PWC experienced two significant water main breaks on Saturday evening, January 6, which caused an extensive loss of water pressure to their system. PWC issued a boil water notice on Saturday evening and as a result, Aqua issued a similar notice – a system pressure advisory – to our customers who may receive this water. Aqua’s customers under this notice reside in the communities of Brookwood South, Brentonwood Hill, Kelly Hill and Raintree. 

A system pressure advisory is issued anytime customers lose water service or have significantly low pressure. 

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Jan 02, 2018 : Aqua North Carolina encourages customers to take steps to prevent pipes from freezing
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Special Alert

Aqua North Carolina encourages customers to take steps to prevent pipes from freezing

Jan 02, 2018

Aqua North Carolina encourages customers to take steps to prevent pipes from freezing

With temperatures well below freezing, Aqua North Carolina is issuing an urgent reminder to homeowners that they should take steps now to prevent their water pipes from freezing.

“Frozen pipes become a concern anytime the high temperature drops below freezing for a sustained period. We want to make sure our customers know how to keep their home’s water flowing during the Arctic blast, and also what to do if their pipes do freeze this winter,” says Aqua North Carolina President Shannon Becker.

Becker recommends that all customers take the following steps ahead of severe winter weather:

  • Make sure to have a supply of heat tape and pipe insulation, as well as a portable space heater and a hair dryer on hand. 
  • Locate and visibly mark the home’s master water valve. In the event that a pipe does break, use this value to turn off water to the home.
  • Make sure the lids on outdoor meter pits are not broken or missing.
  • Shut off and drain any outside faucets including those for lawn sprinkling systems.
  • Prevent drafts in unheated areas, such as crawl spaces or basements, by replacing broken glass or making other repairs.

Becker also advises customers to take the following precautions in any unheated areas of their homes when temperatures drop below freezing:

  • Wrap pipes with insulation material or heat tape. Wrap indoor water meters with a blanket. Proper and safe use of portable space heaters can also keep exposed pipes in drafty areas from freezing.
  • For interior plumbing located on an outside wall such as a kitchen sink, install heat tape to the pipes beneath the sink. If no small children are in the house, open cabinet doors beneath the sink to allow the warm air in the home to reach the pipes.
  • When temperatures remain near 10°F, customers may want to leave a very thin stream of water running continuously from at least one tap in their home—preferably the one farthest from the meter. The additional cost of the water is cheaper than the cost of repairing ruptured pipes.
  • If a customer can locate the frozen area of a pipe, open a spigot and use a hand-held hair dryer (blow dryer) or heat tape to thaw the area. If this does not resolve the issue, contact a licensed plumber.


  • People Served
    271,800
  • Water Connections
    74,775
  • Wastewater Connections
    15,824
  • Water Treatment Facilities
    N/A
  • Wastewater Treatment Facilities
    60
  • Wells
    1,600+
  • Miles of Main
    N/A
  • Public Water Systems (PWSIDs)
    796
  • Employees
    160

North Carolina Service Territory

Learn more about GenX: GenX Information 

Learn more about lead and drinking water: Lead Fact Sheet

Learn why Aqua flushes a water system: Flushing Fact Sheet

North Carolina Mandatory Drought Restrictions

Cold weather advisory: Preventing frozen pipes this winter.


For any questions or concerns relating to customer service, please call 877.987.2782


Aqua North Carolina serves more than 250,000 residents in 52 counties.

Communities in the following counties: Alamance, Alexander, Alleghany, Ashe, Avery, Buncombe, Burke, Cabarrus, Carteret, Caswell, Catawba, Chatham, Cumberland, Davidson, Davie, Durham, Forsyth, Franklin, Gaston, Gran­ville, Guilford, Henderson, Hoke, Iredell, Johnston, Lincoln, McDowell, Mecklenburg, Mitchell, Moore, Nash, New Hanover, Northampton, Onslow, Orange, Pender, Person, Polk, Randolph, Rockingham, Rowan, Rutherford, Stokes, Surry, Transylvania, Union, Vance, Wake, Warren, Watauga, Yadkin and Yancey.


Water Sources: Consolidated rock wells (more than 1,600) and aquifers. The Fayetteville area is served by the Black Creek Aquifer and the Wilmington area is served, in part, by the Castle Hayne Aquifer. In addition, Aqua North Carolina, purchases water from other utilities to resell to its customers.


Leadership Team

Shannon Becker
President

Robert Krueger
Central Area Manager

Joel Mingus
Coastal Area Manager

Laurie Ison
Western Area Manager


Business Development Water and Wastewater

C. Ruffin Poole, CRPoole@AquaAmerica.com, 919.653.6967


Regulatory Agencies 


Frequently Asked Questions

Have a question about our North Carolina operations? We’ve compiled some frequently asked questions to help you learn about issues specific to your state such as hard water and drought. If you have a question not addressed here, you can reach us via the link at the bottom of this page. 

Why is my water discolored, and what is Aqua doing to fix it?

  • Please refer to this document, which discusses naturally occuring minerals in the groundwater.

Why is my water hard? 

  • Hardness is often a characteristic of groundwater and occurs naturally.
  • As the water travels through the ground and enters the aquifer, minerals such as calcium and magnesium that are present in the bedrock dissolve into the water supply. 
  • These minerals that leach into the water give the water what is commonly called “hard” water. Other minerals that can cause hardness and discoloration issues are caused by iron and manganese.

 What can I do to soften my water? 

  • Minerals often build up in home hot water heaters. The higher the temperature, the more likely these minerals are to build up in your hot water heater.
  • Reduce the temperature of your hot water heater.
  • Flush your hot water heater regularly.
  • Purchase an in-home water softener.  

How can I stop the staining that comes from my hard water? 

  • A product called Red B-Gone can be purchased from some local plumbing supply stores.  

Why does my water smell like rotten eggs? 

  • Sulfates are a naturally occurring mineral in some areas of North Carolina.
  • By themselves, sulfates are not a problem.
  • However, when non-harmful, sulfur-reducing bacteria — which are also naturally present in the water — feed on the sulfates, it gives an odor to the water that is often said to smell like rotten eggs.

What is the drought status? 

  • In most cases, we have enough supply for reasonable use. However, some customers do not use water reasonably.
  • The mandatory restrictions that impact all customers were mandated by the North Carolina Utilities Commission (NCUC). 

How do you handle drought violators? 

  • The NCUC has charged Aqua with policing violators. If an Aqua employee witnesses a violation in the regular course of our business, we will engage the customer to make them aware of their action. Aqua will then send the customer a letter that gets copied to the NCUC. The letter informs the customer that if we witness the violation a second time, Aqua will ask the NCUC to allow us to turn off their service. 

What are you doing to find more water sources?

  • In most cases, we have adequate supply for reasonable demand according to the Department of Environmental Health, which equates to 400 gallons per day for a 12-hour day. 

Who’s responsible for the maintenance of grinder pumps?

  • In most cases, Aqua owns and maintains your grinder pump.
  • You can help keep costs down by not putting things like grease, dental floss, kitty litter, etc., into sinks, toilets and drains.

North Carolina Leak Adjustment Form

Download the North Carolina Leak Adjustment Form